Do gluten free communion wafers need to be refrigerated?

Why do communion wafers have to have gluten?

Bread and wafers “must be unleavened, purely of wheat, and recently made so that there is no danger of decomposition,” the letter from the Vatican states. “Hosts that are completely gluten-free are invalid matter for the celebration of the Eucharist.” However, low-gluten wafers and bread may be used, it says.

What are gluten-free communion wafers made of?

Gluten-free communion wafers, many brands of which are sold online, are made of a bunch of different ingredients–garbanzo beans, tapioca, potato starch and rice flour, among others–but not wheat.

Does Holy Communion have gluten?

Receiving Holy Communion is an important part of Christianity, as it is meant as a remembrance of Jesus Christ. However, the communion wafers used as the Holy Sacrament contain wheat, which can pose a problem for individuals who have a wheat allergy or Celiac disease.

Can celiacs receive communion?

Catholics who have celiac disease have to make the very personal decision whether they want to consume low-gluten hosts in order to receive communion. On June 15, 2017, the Vatican issued a reiteration of Church doctrine that stipulates that there has to be wheat in communion wafers.

What is communion bread made out of?

The hostia or sacramental bread, known as prosphorá or a πρόσφορον (prósphoron, “offering”) may be made out of only four ingredients: fine (white) wheat flour, pure water, yeast, and salt. Sometimes holy water will be either sprinkled into the dough or on the kneading trough at the beginning of the process.

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Are prepackaged communion wafers gluten free?

These 1-3/8″ round gluten free wafers for the Lord’s Supper Service are exceptional in quality and packaging. Each wafer is individually wrapped to easily distinguish it from the traditional wafers as well as to prevent cross contamination in transit and storage.

What are gluten free hosts made of?

According to Catholic doctrine, the host must be made of wheat and water only (Can. 924). Hosts made from alternative grains are not acceptable and bread must contain at least a trace of gluten. This is a requirement that is not likely to change.